Perfect Garden or Productive Garden???

radish picker

imperfect rows of baby radishes ready for salad!

There’s a saying entrepreneurs use that goes a little something like this, “perfect is the enemy of done”. They are referring to the relationship between trying to craft the perfect product or solution and actually getting that product or solution to market. Don’t fret about perfect!

Edible gardeners would be wise to follow the same advice. Forgot about magazine perfect gardens, don’t fantasize over idealistic visions of vegetable rows lined up like soldiers ready for a salad bowl battle.

In my experience, things will go wrong in the garden. Seeds will get washed away or will fail to germinate. Animals and other pests will eat crops. Mother nature will do her best to both support your efforts and frustrate you into near submission. However, the wise and persistent edible gardener will always persevere if they don’t worry about being perfect.

Relax, keep expectations in check, enjoy the imperfect beauty of nature and just get gardening. Seeds will sprout, plants will grow (mostly) and you will have food to enjoy. Takes notes along the way and get better and better at the process each season.

Enjoy that imperfect garden!

Get a Discount to Celebrate Fall Edible Gardening

We are offering our biggest discount ever to help get folks into fall edible gardening. That’s right, many of the veggies and herbs you grow in spring and summer can also carry over or be grown again in the fall.

Act soon because most zones need to begin planning (and even planting) now! You will love having an extended growing season and probably save some money on produce too.

We want to help get you started by offering $4 off the $14 price of our edible garden planning guide book. You can only get this discount by buying direct from our eStore. Enter code W84YWAVZ to get the $4 discount. Offer expires 08/31/2016.

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Plan Your Garden, Garden Your Plan!!!!!

Happy shopping and great growing!

First 2016 Bucket of Potatoes Harvest

It may have been a bit early, but our bucket of Red Norland potatoes was ready to harvest. Red Norland are an early maturing potato variety anyway, but this bucket was even earlier because of the type of pot or “bucket” that we used.

To make a long story short, we gave our last white potato bucket to a friend who wanted to grow his own bucket of potato goodness. As is usually the case when you give something away, we wound up needing it!

Some extra Red Norland seed potatoes needed a home and we were without the usual white bucket. Instead, we dropped them into a large black pot filled with our fabulous DIY Backyard Farm soil.

At first everything was going great. The spring did not bring hot temps at all and there was plenty of rain. Then Mother Nature turned up the heat. The days got longer and the sun got hotter. What do you think we learned???

Yes, the early days of science class came blasting back into our minds. Black colors absorb sun, white colors reflect it. Our black pot was turning our potatoes into french fries!!!

We moved the pot into a part sun area and watered it twice a day to help revive the greens. The plants started to turn around and then they suddenly browned out and went flat. Was all lost???

Watch the video below to find out!

Learn to Harvest Garlic

A few minutes time watching this video will help teach you the proper timeing and technique for harvesting your garlic. Didn’t grow garlic?

Watch it anyway to get inspired. We plant ours every October. Will you be planting some in 2016?

A Tip For My Container Gardening Friends

fishnure tomato experiment

Give your container garden soil a refreshing “mix”

Someone asked me a great question at a recent edible gardening seminar I was speaking at. She was a container gardener who asked what she should be doing with her soil at the beginning of the season. The woman was referring to how to prep the soil before planting the new season’s crop.

Containers do not benefit from the same natural changes our garden soils go through. For example, contaners will have less or even no earth worms patroling the soil on “doody” Containers certainly don’t cooperate when you’re trying to turn their soil over either.

Wait, maybe there is a better way to prep container garden soil…

When I prepare my container gardens I usually group them all together and dump them into a large wheelbarrow or onto a tarp. My goal is to break up the soil, remove the larger roots that are left over from previous crops and amend the soil. I will usually add some soil blend, compost and/or organic vegetable garden fertilizer.

If you are adding any soils or fertilizers be sure you are using ones designed specifically for edible gardening. Lastly, more DOES NOT equal better when it comes to fertilizer. Follow product instructions.

After I get the soil pile nice and mixed and free of clumps I add it all back into the containers. I usually have some left over because the soil gets nice and airated from breaking up the clumps and gentle mixing in of the aforementioned ammendments. A nice excuse to start a new container!

 

Healthy Inspiration

Today I received a daily writing prompt that challenged me to write a post based on a single word. The word for today is, “healthy”.

I was immediately reminded of this post I wrote about a year ago. Getting a new generation of eaters on the health train is one of the most rewarding things I can think of. It is a big reason I smile widely when I see kids enjoying their home-grown fruits, vegetables and herbs.

Enjoy!
Healthy

Keep Birds Away From Your Seeds and Seedlings

Scarecrows have been used for years to deter birds and other animals from eating farm crops. Here on the DIY Backyard Farm, hungry robins are particularly damaging hunters of freshly planted seeds and young seedlings.

This season we upcycled some broken garden hose into our own version of a scarecrow. Actually, we made many versions! As you can see in the picture below, a broken garden hose can quickly be made to look like a snake. My kids loved decorating these and I have loved the results.

I am even using these around the lawn to keep the birds on their toes and away from the grass seed I just planted.

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Save Money on Our Edible Garden Planning Guidebook

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Get $2.00 Off

Growing your own healthy, delicious produce is already a great deal. Now you can save $2.00 on our edible garden planning guidebook too! That’s enough to buy yourself an extra packet of seeds!

Go to our eStore and use promo code 6MTZKLVE to save $2 off the $14 retail price of our latest book. Discount code is on applicable at our eStore. Offer expires 06/01/2016

Sorry, I only sell in the USA right now. If demand increases and I start selling more books I may be able to expand distribution. Thanks for understanding!

Choosing The Right Seeds

IMG_0582If you are into growing your own produce than this time of year your mailbox is probably flooded with seed catalogs. If you’re really into edible gardening you might be sneaking some peaks at online seed catalogs while you are at work. Excitement is building for the edible gardening season to come. You almost smell the tomatoes!

Speaking of tomatoes…

I find descriptions of tomato seeds and plants to be packed with exciting descriptives and amazing amounts of hyperbole. Yesterday a gardening friend and self-confessed tomato addict gave me a description for a unique “chocolate” style hybrid. After reading the description I was ready to sell all my Hershey stock and race to the store to buy every Ghiradelli bar I could find. I was certain no one would eat chocolate again. Why would anyone eat chocolate when they can grow their own?

Now back to reality, at least for a minute. I have grown some of these chocolate varieties of tomatoes. Some are tasty with great texture and unique flavor profiles. Others are rather boring and do not come close to their seed catalog descriptions. In any case, none have ever made me think I was tasting chocolate.

The moral to this story is to mostly grow what you like and are familiar with. Pick fruits, vegetables and herbs you enjoy and would normally buy in the store. Of course you should make sure they will grow in your zone and specific garden conditions. Then, each season you can throw in one or two exciting new edibles to see if they appeal to you. Just do not get carried away. I have seen many edible gardens suffer from overcrowding created by an overzealous, but good intentioned gardener.

What new fruit, vegetable or herb are you going to try growing this year?

edible garden collage

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